Confessions of a Rufflebutt

The little place of lolita, steampunk, otome and otaku-ness of Yamneko, a self-proclaimed Ruffle-butt.

Showing posts tagged lolita

Gothic Lolita Bible Patterns volumes 21-30

List of Patterns in the Mbooks. - GLB v21-30

Read More

So while at Universal, in their City Walk area, there’s a sock shop! Only a few of the things caught my eye, and after doing some online looking, these two brands (Catherine Cole and Foot Traffic) seem to be something to look into. 

I know for a lot of us (not me) the hot months are winding down and the colder months are starting, but in the summer time, socks and tights can be a bit bothersome, but here are some cute lace topped socks to help keep you cooler. 

Both Catherine Cole and Foot Traffic looked like there was a variety of colors to chose from in the store. 

Music Legs is also another brand, but as far as I can tell, they don’t have a website, but can be found in stores if you’re lucky? (in black or white)

palaceofprinces:

New Release: Sheglit - Chambray Halter Vest

Colors: Navy

Price: 17,280 Yen

(via ohmyyesgothiclolita)

aerynsys:

New Release: Metamorphose - Flared High-low Tailed Coat - 11043009 

Reservation Time: To Be Determined

Colors: Viridian

Price: 47,304 Yen

(via pardonmybloomers)

Budget Lolita is Getting Lace to Fit The Budget

20dollarlolita:

A big part of Lolita fashion is about lace. It’s a commonly discussed topic from the oh-my-frills so cute custom laces from the new Brand releases to the really questionable lace on the Milanoo and friends dresses. 

Fastest thing to throw a good dress into the ita (which roughly translates to “so badly done it hurts your eyes to look at) category is to use the wrong lace. 

I’m not going to use names for lace today. I’m going to talk about the qualities of lace that make it something I would use or not. 

There are two main reasons why you put lace on a dress: Contrast and texture. 

Lace is a detail that we give to dresses to add visual interest, to draw the eye to certain places. To help take a plain bell-shaped dress and give it the detail overload that Lolita fashion relies on. 

So let’s get started. This is all from my personal lace collection, so you may have seen some of it in a past post. 

image

Here’s an overview of laces I would use. All of these laces provide contrast and have a pleasing or acceptable texture

Take a look at how they look together. Notice what they have in common.

image

So for this text, the laces are laying on, from left to right, black fabric, white fabric, pale-colored fabric, and patterned fabric.

The wide rose lace at the top (ignore the thin strand up there. It doesn’t know what it’s doing there) provides a lot of texture. You can see that on the black fabric. Everything is black or white. Nothing looks gray. The roses themselves have texture. The center of the petals are thicker than the edges. This lace is interesting to see from many angles.

I would use this lace on any garment where the rose theme is appropriate. 

The cream colored lace  with the flowers and the leaves doesn’t look very good on the black. The contrast is off. There is too much gray muddy color in the background. I would not use this lace on black fabric. 

But look at what happens on white fabric. Look at the detail there. The way the flowers stand out on the white looks really pleasing. This effect disappears on the blue and patterned backgrounds.

This lace is also thick, though it doesn’t have the variety of thicknesses that the rose lace has. 

One more thing to mention: Note how the pattern on this lace looks blocky or pixelated. Normally, this is a sign of bad lace. This is because of the way that raschel lace tends to look. In this case, the lace is made by the filet method, and it’s a different look of blocky. This is up to you, though. If you don’t like the lace, you can simply not put it on your dress. There will sometimes be lace that is totally Lolita that you don’t like. You’re the one making the dress. You have all the power. Exterminate the lace you do not like. Do not give it shelter in your dress. 

I would use this lace ONLY on white fabrics.

The ruffled lace with the eyelets has a lot of contrast (though not much balance in the contrast. Lots of white.) and it looks pretty much the same on every color. 

It’s made of cotton fabric with embroidered detail. That gives it texture and the eyelets in it allow it to have some contrast. 

Since this lace is opaque, I like using it on hems and in seams, and not on the dress itself. It tends to not look good when it’s not ruffled (IMO)

image

The very wide lace with the embroidered flowers  has a variety of textures due to both the eyelets and embroideries. 

It doesn’t look too good on the black. Everything comes across as gray. 
It doesn’t look too good on the white. The pattern’s lost. 

I would use this lace on hems. In hems, you have light shining through the lace that will highlight the embroidery. 

The ruffled lace second from the bottom has great contrast. Even ruffled, nothing loses its pattern.
This lace is not my favorite in this batch. It is thick but it feels rough, stiff, and a little bit scratchy. Un-ruffled, I would use it on all colors of fabric. I’ve used it on hems, but it’s not my favorite. 

The bottom ruffled lace has good contrast and interest. However, the pattern looks somewhat rough and blocky. I think this lace would look good on white fabric, but is usable on all fabrics. 

image

Okay, my collection of lace I probably won’t use. 
All of these laces fall into a category called rashcel lace. This is generally a lace to be avoided (though it is not inherently evil. But that’s another entry, using raschel lace tastefully). All of these laces are thin and flat. Their thickness is not more than a couple pieces of paper.

The yellow lace is actually something I’ve used. The multicolors give it contrast, in addition to the holes on the top. However, I would never use this lace on fabric that wasn’t yellow or white. Notice how it’s turning the blue strip a little bit green? Green is not a color I’d want in a blue and yellow coord.

I’d use this on white or yellow fabric.

The pink lace is interesting, because when ruffled it looks like a much higher-quality lace. When stretched out, it becomes obvious that it has no contrast. 

I would use this ruffled, on the hem of something like bloomers where it will not be looked at too much. 

The wide white lace shows everything wrong about raschel lace. Look at it stretched out. It’s not white-on-black, but gray-on-black. Ruffled it’s scratchy and boring-looking. 

I honestly cannot think of a Lolita application for this lace.

The red lace at the bottom  IS NOT LACE. I know it looks like lace, but it’s called seam binding. The lace pattern allows it to bend with the seams and it gives it a cute look when you look at the inside of a use it to help with a hem that’s just not quite long enough. This is a tool to be used on the INSIDE of garments. 

If you want to put it on a dress, fine, but know that everyone who sews is going to look at it and go “oh, seam binding.”

So I hope this was in some way helpful.
I think it’s more important to know what qualities good lace has than to memorize names of different types of lace. If you find something  mislabeled or on sale, you’ll be able to look at it and decide if it’s Lolita quality. From now on, you don’t need to worry about stocking up on lace and discovering that it’s not usable. Budget Lolita is not wasting dollars.

And remember, if you like the lace and you want to put it on something, but you know that it’s totally wrong for Lolita, go right ahead. Make clothes you love. If it’s not Lolita, it’s not Lolita. Put on your Lolita-inspired outfit, wear what you feel makes you beautiful, and fuck the haters. There’s never anything wrong with wearing clothes you like.
Just don’t go posting things you know aren’t Lolita on Daily-Lolita or they’ll tear you apart.

Go forth rejoicing in the power of the frills.

(via fyeahclassiclolita)

Am I too ____ for Lolita?

pardonmybloomers:

frillyroses:

Whatever you put in that blank, the answer is no.

Tall, short, fat, skinny, poor, WHATEVER problem you have that is “holding you back” from wearing Lolita—it isn’t. It’s in your mind. You can be ANYTHING and wear Lolita, and it breaks my heart to see people think that something as superficial as being plus sized, tall, or WHATEVER keep them from doing something they want to do.

You might need to have an item lengthened, add a panel of shirring/get custom sizing, or wear an underskirt—but trust me, there are a MILLION ways around these imaginary problems!

The only thing that you can be too much of for lolita is rude. Seriously, rude people, we don’t have time to deal with your shenanigans, we’re too busy enjoying what we wear.

mszombi:

frillyroses:

Halloween coord in progress. Going for a “bat” theme! Will probably wear it with one of my chiffon blouses, but I haven’t decided which one yet. Whatever looks best with the neckline of the JSK when I get it! Hoping that my Queen of Bats JSK will be here by Halloween, but if not, oh well. I’ll still wear this coordinate!!!

Headdress: Antique Beast
Cape: Ichigo15
Bat skull brooch: Restyle.pl
JSK: Cherie Cerise
Bat cuffs: Aetherlund
Shoes: Offbrand (Payless)

Loves it!

yetanotherjfashionblog:

Magic Cat Street - Chiffon Gradient JSK reservations

The first batch will be shipped out around 25 July. After 25th July they are still taking orders, the second batch will be sent out around 10 August. Every pre-order participant will receive a complimentary pair of wristcuffs. The headdress cannot be purchased separately. The headdress is limited to 5 pieces for Forest of Jade; 10 pieces each for every other colour.

Materials: Chiffon 100-120 denier

Options: +头带 (JSK + headdress), 单jsk (JSK only)

Colours: 冰蓝之空 (Ice sky blue), 枯木之林 (Wilting Woods), 红酒之醇 (Fine Red Wine), 玫瑰之约 (Date with the Rose), 翡翠之森(Forest of Jade)

(via peter-pans-booty-shorts)

whatevendoe asked:

Lolita the book was published in 1955. The lolita fashion did not make its appearance until around the 1980s at the earliest. Do you really think it's a coincidence that dressing like a prepubescent girl is called lolita now? Come on girl.

petitepasserine:

Come on, girl, stop being an ignorant know-it-all and realize 1000+ people firmly disagrees with your ridiculous opinion. Is it really that tiresome to google the name Lolita? Appareantly dense people like you just can’t be assed to open a new tab, so here is some information for you;

LOLITA IS A SPANISH NICKNAME. LOLITA is a nickname that existed way before the book was published. It’s a spanish nickname for girls named Dolores, just like Dolly. It’s just a cute name people gave to cute girls named Dolores.

The main character in Lolita, the book, was called Dolores. Vladimir Nabokov didn’t invent the name Lolita, his main character was called Lolita because it already existed BEFORE HE WROTE THE BOOK.

The lolita FASHION took it’s name from the spanish nickname because it was a cute nickname for girls, usually feminine and cute girls, named Dolores. The sexual connotations only exist in the western world, some countries still use the name Lolita as a nickname because the name isn’t anything sexual to them, just like how lolita fashion isn’t sexual. It’s literally just the western world that sexualizes the shit out of children and convince everybody their definition is the right one. Just because you’ve been raised to believe something does not mean it’s true.

Come on, girl. Don’t be an asshat pretending like you own the world and know everything when you don’t even know how to use google. Jesus, some people are so painfully self-confident when they’ve literally got no reason to be.

Come on, girl, do your research! It’s really not that hard! :-D

schwirl asked:

Lolita is sexual. Literally. The definition of lolita is a sexually attractive adolescent girl. It's not just a cute 'kawaii' fashion statement. You can't sexualise something that is already sexual by default.

manda-the-stars-shine-bright:

streetsnapfashion:

petitepasserine:

thethirddecade1121:

p0kemina:

petitepasserine:

Wrong, wrong, and wrong. Literally. If I got a dollar for every person who thought this because they couldn’t be assed to do their research, I’d be a happy girl indeed.

Lolita is a book written by Vladimir Nabokov about a girl named Dolores Haze, but her nickname is Lolita. The protagonist of Lolita falls in love with Dolores despite him being 42 and her being 12. He is a pedophile who abuses, rapes and takes sexual advantage of her after becoming her stepfather.

Lolita FASHION is something else entirely. Lolita FASHION is a fashion trend that started in Harajuku, inspired by victorian fashion, victorian dolls, sailor dresses and femininity, and most of all, self-expression. It has NOTHING to do with the book by the same name. The only thing they share is their name. Lolita FASHION has nothing to do with sex, because it’s just that; A FASHION. 

Lolita is a term misguided and misinformed people (such as yourself) use about attractive girls when, in truth, it stems from a book about a pedophile rapist.

Do your research before you try to start a discussion on something you have no clue about. There is absolutely no reason for you to be this much of an arrogant know-it-all when you haven’t even done the research to back up your arguments. Don’t be overconfident before you’re 100% certain that you’re right. 

Can I just add a thing here

When my mum heard about / discovered that this weird fashion I started trying to wear at 16 was called “lolita,” she had a miniature heart attack. She thought I didn’t understand that that word was used in the wrong context often. She thought that the fashion was intended to be sexual and that I was too naive to understand that, and that I just took it to be a cute fashion. Here’s the thing tho: it IS just a cute fashion. And after explaining this, she was then worried that other gross people would sexualise me against my will or target me and therefore I shouldn’t be wearing it.

Wrong. It is other people’s fault for sexualising me, not mine. It is never my fault, if I am sexualised against my will. It is never anybody’s fault.

Especially when, personally, I liked the idea of lolita because it was so darn sweet and elegant, and in my opinion, so not-sexually-charged in a world that shoved sex in my face every day. It was a breath of fresh air. I’ve had more sexual connotations associated with me when I was fucking 12 and wore a tank top and shorts to grade 7 orientation on a hot summers day and everyone who didn’t know my name called me ~the girl with the boobs~ for two years straight. Like ????

And then we fast forward to when I met my dad’s partner and she heard about lolita and had a minature heart attack because, in juxtaposition to my mum, it was so adorable, she couldn’t believe it. In her native culture, Lolita was a nickname for Dolores and had little-to-no sexual connotations with it. She even, if my memory serves me right, mentioned that lolita or dolly was just something you called sweet young girls. So the word was really fitting and it was all just so sweet and cute. She even pronounces it with a Spanish accent despite having an Australian accent because that’s what you do with totally native words.

So I’m emphasising a cultural difference here.

And here’s my thing, here’s a bit of TL;DR:

Have pedophiles and misogynist pigs who sexualise young girls seriously infiltrated every aspect of our society that it is somehow more fucking plausible that girls who want to dress in cute and feminine fashion are doing so because they want to be sexualised? Or that they should expect to be sexualised? Is that what people are saying now? That girls cannot take charge over their lives and their aesthetic for one god damned second before being, yet again, sexualised in every aspect of their being?

I don’t want to use ‘you’re damned if you do, and damned if you don’t’ but hey, that’s all I can muster up right now because I feel like I’m on a different fricking planet.

And, as a not-so-subtle side note, if you don’t think mainstream porn and it’s culture has something to do with this, you are dead wrong.

Amazing new concept: If girls want to be sexual, they can be sexual. If they don’t, they don’t. Either fucking way it is impossible to win when mainstream society oversexualises young girls and their fashion in an ~adult way~ and if you somehow take a different path you’re fetishised as an ~innocent sex nymph doll~ like where the fuck do we draw the line?

I will tell you where we draw the god damned line: where ever the fuck the girl in question draws her own m o t h er fricking line.

WOW.

Thank you for writing this. I thought they were the same thing and I was really disturbed so I’m REALLY glad to learn that the fashion and the book are not related at all, whew. Also gross men stop it and go away.

holy mother of Jesus PREACH IT MINA

My big question is why, in 2014, people still read that freaking book and are not able to think ‘Wow, it’s HER NICKNAME not some sexual connotation with her being underaged! omg! News!! News!’ I’m glad I can tell people here where I live that I like lolita fashion because no one thinks it’s some sort of trap to catch predators or something since people know it’s a NAME.

Just throwing this out there but the book had already had a word for ‘a sexually precocious young girl’ that people seem to forget quite often. Nymphet. The sexual definition of lolita was derived from the book’s definition of nymphet. There is literally no reason to be using the word lolita to describe a sexually precocious young girl because there’s already a word for it.

She even, if my memory serves me right, mentioned that lolita or dolly was just something you called sweet young girls.

If this is true, then the fashion was probably named after the nickname, then the word Lolita being borrowed, surprised, not from English. And makes 1000x more sense for the name of the fashion. 

20dollarlolita:

seriouspollynod:

spreepicky:

Lolita Good Match Bow Hair Bang Free Ship SP141089 $16.99 (via Lolita Good Match Bow Hair Bang Free Ship SP141089 · SpreePicky · Online Store Powered by Storenvy)

This photo’s stolen from Baby the Stars Shine Bright


  
Baby does the crisscross ribbon thing when photographing them flat too, like you see in the storenvy listing.


That or they did a very good job replicating their photo setup. 
I’m not saying the product is bunk, but there’s a good chance that it won’t look like the picture. Personally, I suggest that you do not buy from a seller who uses stolen photos, even if the reviews say it’s good. 
Budget Lolita is not getting ripped off. Not everyone selling online is a scammer, but you should know how to spot stolen pictures.
Lolita is a very niche fashion based on high quality. Everything needs to be made of good materials, nice lace, custom prints so detailed that you have to have special printing techniques. Only a few of each dress are made, and that drives the price up. The Brands also are taking risks that Bodyline or replicators aren’t. The Brands are coming up with new things and new ideas that they don’t know will sell. Something unpopular can lose them a lot of money. Making a replica of a very successful print is easy. You know what to make and that it will sell. Bodyline copies the latest trends and adds their own spin, but still keeping it relatively safe. 
When you look at it, Brand pricing isn’t as extreme as it seems at first glance. Does that mean I can afford it? Hell no. But it means that if you see a product at a price that is too good to be true, there’s a good chance it is. 
Remember your weapons when shopping online:
Know how all the Brands photograph their products, both now and in the past, and where they put their watermarks.
Know how much you would expect to pay for this item. Know how much you would expect to pay for the materials to make it. 
Can you make this thing? Will you?
Watch out for anywhere that throws huge watermarks onto the photos all the way across the picture. Most reputable sellers I can think of keep their watermark in the corner. Look for pictures that seem like they’ve had their watermark cropped off. 
When you see something you like, check taobao or reputable taobao resellers like qutieland or ClobbaOnline to make sure someone’s not reselling taobao brands at massively marked up prices.
Just a couple things to think about if you’re shopping online.

(Posted this on the wrong frilling blog so I’m reblogging it over to here.)

20dollarlolita:

seriouspollynod:

spreepicky:

Lolita Good Match Bow Hair Bang Free Ship SP141089
$16.99 (via Lolita Good Match Bow Hair Bang Free Ship SP141089 · SpreePicky · Online Store Powered by Storenvy)

This photo’s stolen from Baby the Stars Shine Bright

  

Baby does the crisscross ribbon thing when photographing them flat too, like you see in the storenvy listing.

That or they did a very good job replicating their photo setup. 

I’m not saying the product is bunk, but there’s a good chance that it won’t look like the picture. Personally, I suggest that you do not buy from a seller who uses stolen photos, even if the reviews say it’s good. 

Budget Lolita is not getting ripped off. Not everyone selling online is a scammer, but you should know how to spot stolen pictures.

Lolita is a very niche fashion based on high quality. Everything needs to be made of good materials, nice lace, custom prints so detailed that you have to have special printing techniques. Only a few of each dress are made, and that drives the price up. The Brands also are taking risks that Bodyline or replicators aren’t. The Brands are coming up with new things and new ideas that they don’t know will sell. Something unpopular can lose them a lot of money. Making a replica of a very successful print is easy. You know what to make and that it will sell. Bodyline copies the latest trends and adds their own spin, but still keeping it relatively safe. 

When you look at it, Brand pricing isn’t as extreme as it seems at first glance. Does that mean I can afford it? Hell no. But it means that if you see a product at a price that is too good to be true, there’s a good chance it is. 

Remember your weapons when shopping online:

  1. Know how all the Brands photograph their products, both now and in the past, and where they put their watermarks.
  2. Know how much you would expect to pay for this item. Know how much you would expect to pay for the materials to make it. 
  3. Can you make this thing? Will you?
  4. Watch out for anywhere that throws huge watermarks onto the photos all the way across the picture. Most reputable sellers I can think of keep their watermark in the corner. Look for pictures that seem like they’ve had their watermark cropped off. 
  5. When you see something you like, check taobao or reputable taobao resellers like qutieland or ClobbaOnline to make sure someone’s not reselling taobao brands at massively marked up prices.

Just a couple things to think about if you’re shopping online.

(Posted this on the wrong frilling blog so I’m reblogging it over to here.)

(via pardonmybloomers)

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

(via shortcuttothestars)

sugar-honey-iced-tea:

Book 5, the latest book (watch this space, when the future books come out I’ll collect those too and review them, also when I’m living in japan next year I can collect lolita mooks and books far more easily and show you some new books you may enjoy so check the reviews tag~!) this book had outfits you can make based on fairytales such as Alice in Wonderland, Little Red Riding hood and Snow White. Snow whites outfit was by far my favourite and it featured a chiffon overskirt that would be useful to jazz up a number of coords, also the laced up bodice was quite beautiful. Also features some shirred dresses that I wasn’t a big fan of, a cutsew pattern, a really plain skirt, and some classic pieces further in. Also a salopette pattern and a casual sailor shirt dress. No brand collabs this time. Keep a look out for their next one, a winter and autumn book, no doubt I’ll buy that on my holiday this year.

(via manda-the-stars-shine-bright)